Tag: Policy

How California’s AB 2345 Can Help Build Housing Resilience

How California’s AB 2345 Can Help Build Housing Resilience

How California’s AB 2345 Can Help Build Housing Resilience

03/22/20

“How will AB 2345 by California Assemblymember Lorena Gonzalez-Fletcher help build housing resilience in the state?”

 

By all means, California has an affordable housing crisis, primarily driven by a lack of supply. However, AB 2345 by Assemblymember Lorena Gonzalez-Fletcher of San Diego promises to help change that. If enacted, AB 2345 would increase “density bonuses” for developers that set up to 15% of units in their projects that are within a half-mile of transit stops for lower-income and very low-income individuals. This would help these communities get out of urban sprawl and into newer, more resilient housing units. This is How California’s AB 2345 Can Help Build Housing Resilience.

How California’s AB 1851 Is Beneficial for Climate Policy

How California’s AB 1851 Is Beneficial for Climate Policy

How California’s AB 1851 Is Beneficial for Climate Policy

03/21/20

“How can AB 1851 by Assemblymember Wicks lead to more sustainable and resilient living in California?”

 

At present faith communities in the state of California are unable to build housing on parking lots that they own. However, this could all change with the introduction of a single bill. AB 1851 by Assemblymember Buffy Wicks of the East Bay would allow for faith-based institutions to replace any parking lots that they own with housing. Since a disproportionate amount of potential housing would be close to centers of faith, not only would it decrease car travel and therefore emissions but also increase societal resilience by allowing for greater cohesion and community. This is How California’s AB 1851 Is Beneficial for Climate Policy.

The Impact of COVID-19 on the Construction Industry

The Impact of COVID-19 on the Construction Industry

The Impact of COVID-19 on the Construction Industry

03/19/20

“What is the impact of COVID-19 on the construction industry?”

 

As of writing, the coronavirus outbreak is freezing the economic engine of global capitalism. The construction industry is no exception to this. With the spread of the disease, people are being forced to stay at home or are becoming sick, resulting in a labor shortage. Global logistics are also going through a downturn, making it more difficult to obtain the necessary materials. All of these combine to cause a slump in construction, straining the already present housing crisis and potential recession. This is The Impact of COVID-19 on the Construction Industry.

Why the Oil Market Is in a Freefall Right Now

Why the Oil Market Is in a Freefall Right Now

Why the Oil Market Is in a Freefall Right Now

03/18/20

“Why are oil prices sinking to all new lows?”

 

Oil prices are sinking to dramatic lows. This has the potential to devastate industries and send the world community into an economic recession. But what exactly is causing this?

 

Near the beginning of the year, the need to limit travel because of the new coronavirus epidemic had caused flight demand to drop. This led to a decrease in oil demand, prompting OPEC to propose a limit on oil production globally to keep prices stable. However, Russia ignored these rulings and continued its production as normal, hoping to capture a greater share of the market. Saudi Arabia responded by slashing oil prices, selling below market value to ensure its stake in the market. Both countries (at the time of writing) are now proposing an increase in production in an all-out market war. Combined with the fact that oil demand is plummeting due to coronavirus restrictions, and you have a price that is soaring down. This is Why the Oil Market Is in a Freefall Right Now.

Why Newer Housing Will Be Necessary for Disaster Resilience

Why Newer Housing Will Be Necessary for Disaster Resilience

Why Newer Housing Will Be Necessary for Disaster Resilience

03/17/20

“Why will new housing be a necessity for disaster resilience?”

 

With the ever-increasing level of global interconnectivity and average temperatures, disasters are going to become more deadly. Since the exterior environment might become too dangerous during these times, people may need to stay inside for long periods of time. More modern housing usually ensures greater safety due to updated codes and building materials. For example, more modern housing tends to have better air filtration which can clear out particulate matter that may occur from a wildfire. Newer housing can also be designed to resist and absorb floods that may occur. And in case of a government-mandated quarantine, newer housing can provide a more comfortable living environment. This is Why Newer Housing Will Be Necessary for Disaster Resilience.

Infill Development

Infill Development

Infill Development

03/01/20

“How can we build in an urban area that’s already in use?”

 

The global housing crisis is one of the largest social and infrastructure problems right now. One course of action that holds great promise is to convert a space in an urban area that’s currently not in use or underutilized (such as a decaying factory) into something new using Infill Development. Infill development not only holds the potential to increase the amount of housing and infrastructure available in a city but also combat sprawl by allowing for cities to not have to spread out to accommodate for new development.

 

Image credit http://www.prologis.com

Climate Migration Analysis

Climate Migration Analysis

Climate Migration Analysis

02/25/20

“How can researchers analyze how a population migrates because of climate change?”

 

Climate migration will be one of the most important humanitarian issues of the 21st century. And to get a better understanding of it, researchers will need to analyze the effects going on. This can be done using Climate Migration Analysis, which studies the factors that cause populations to move from one location to another and how it might shift climate vulnerabilities.

 

Image credit assetsds.cdnedge.bluemix.net