Category: Other-science

Why Tempered Glass is Used for Cooking Lids

Why Tempered Glass is Used for Cooking Lids

Why Tempered Glass is Used for Cooking Lids

03/17/19

“What type of glass is used for cooking lids?”
Cooking food is one of the most intricate parts of human life, whether it be meal-prepping for the week or dining with friends. And if one is using a pot then one of the most useful things is to see what is going on underneath. That way, we can monitor what processes are occurring and what to do if something goes wrong. Usually, translucent covers are made of glass. However, since cooking involves high changes in temperature and pressure, the glass needs to be extremely strong and sturdy. As a result, tempered glass with its thermal strength is used. This is why Tempered Glass is Used for Cooking Lids.

Marginal Cost

Marginal Cost

Marginal Cost

02/16/19

“What happens to total cost if one more unit is produced?”

 

Everything in economics has a cost associated with it. And these costs and can be divided into different categories. Take a factory producing solar panels for example. There is already a base cost with operating the factory, and the total cost for each unit of production. This is known as the Marginal Cost and can be used in risk assessment of engineering projects. Sometimes when more units are produced in a given span, the cost goes down because of economies of scale, while other times it goes up.

 

Image credit img.tfd.com

How Community Choice Aggregators Can Offer Cleaner Energy at Lower Rates

How Community Choice Aggregators Can Offer Cleaner Energy at Lower Rates

How Community Choice Aggregators Can Offer Cleaner Energy at Lower Rates

02/12/19

How can community-sourced energy be cheaper and greener?

 

There is a revolution brewing in the renewable energy world. While in the past residents and businesses were tied to one electric utility based on their geographic area, organizations known as Community Choice Aggregators are starting to sprout up and challenge this. Community choice aggregators or CCAs are non-profit organizations that procure power generation and deliver it to customers through a utility’s transmission lines. Since these do not operate for investors and only need to pay for energy and staff, they can give their customers better rates than traditional electricity service and focus on particular resources. To illustrate, just look at the CCA San Jose Clean Energy. Even though their energy portfolio is 45% Renewable Energy/80% carbon-free, they sell energy at rates 1% lower than the standard San Francisco Bay Area PG&E service which is 33% Renewable Energy/78% carbon-free. This is How Community Choice Aggregators Can Offer Cleaner Energy at Lower Rates!

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The Works of Marie M. Daly

The Works of Marie M. Daly

The Works of Marie M. Daly

07/09/19

“Why is the work of Marie M. Daly (the first Black American Woman to receive a Ph.D. in Chemistry in the United States) so important?”

 

During her lifetime, Marie M. Daly was a prolific scientist. Trained as a Biochemist from Columbia University, she sought to understand the fundamental workings of the human body. During her career, she uncovered many of its secrets such as methods for the fractionalization of nuclear material to separate the essentials of a cell into its various components, The role of ribonucleoprotein in protein synthesis (which was later used in Watson and Crick’s discoveries of DNA structure), as well as work on cholesterol, hypertension, and creatine. In short, The Works of Marie M. Daly are paramount to our collective understanding of human biochemistry.  

 

Image credit Balis, M. E., Samarth, K. D., Hamilton, M. G., & Petermann, M. L. (1958). Role of the ribonucleoprotein particle in protein synthesis and the effects of growth hormone. Journal of Biological Chemistry233(5), 1152-1155.

A Few Energy Saving Tips for a Super Scary Halloween

A Few Energy Saving Tips for a Super Scary Halloween

A Few Energy Saving Tips for a Super Scary Halloween

10/31/18

“How can we be both green and scary on Halloween?”

 

Today in the United States and across the world is Halloween. Here stateside, people dress up in silly costumes, decorate their house, and trick-or-treat for candy. But even though this is a special night, it is still time to be thinking about how we can do our part to climate change. So here are A Few Energy Saving Tips for a Super Scary Halloween.

 

  1. Use LED lights for Halloween decorations.
  2. Use solar panels to capture energy during the day and unload it at night
  3. Give out low-carbon intensity candies.

 

Have a great night full of scary sugary goodness Y’all!!!

 

Image credit media.treehugger.com

The Grid Edge

The Grid Edge

The Grid Edge

10/30/18

“What exactly is the bleeding edge of the utility industry?”

 

The utility industry is evolving rapidly. The days of the old, centralized paradigm are now gone. In their place is a network of distributed and autonomous systems capable of handling the renewable, resilient future. Companies that are on the bleeding edge of all of this are known as The Grid Edge, and are positioned to grow their market manyfold in the near future.

How Extreme Weather Events Can Cause Energy Prices to Skyrocket

How Extreme Weather Events Can Cause Energy Prices to Skyrocket

How Extreme Weather Events Can Cause Energy Prices to Skyrocket

10/22/18

“How can extreme weather events cause energy prices to go out of whack?”

 

When the weather gets too hot or too cold, people will turn on HVAC systems to compensate. This will cause greater demand on the electricity system, which in turn will lead to more constraints and therefore higher costs for everyone. This is How Extreme Weather Events Can Cause Energy Prices to Skyrocket. The advent of climate change will only exacerbate this, as extreme weather events will become far more frequent.  So in the end, it will pay in the long term to upgrade critical infrastructure systems to more resilient standards.

 

Image credit Bigerna, S. (2018). Estimating temperature effects on the Italian electricity market. Energy Policy118, 257-269.