Why We Can Learn From Resimulating Past Climate Disasters

Why We Can Learn From Resimulating Past Climate Disasters

Why We Can Learn From Resimulating Past Climate Disasters

03/05/21

“How can we learn from resimulating past climate disasters?”

Past climate disasters have had a tremendous influence on current climate policy, whether it be the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina or the events that caused the meltdown in Fukashima. One way to see why they happened and to learn more is to resimulate past disasters and extrapolate why it occurred and how would it affect current infrastructure. This is Why We Can Learn From Resimulating Past Climate Disasters.

One thought on “Why We Can Learn From Resimulating Past Climate Disasters

  1. For me, human existence has for too long been analogous to a cafeteria lineup consisting of diversely societally represented people, all adamantly arguing over which identifiable traditionally marginalized person should be at the front and, conversely, at the back of the line. Many of them further fight over to whom amongst them should go the last piece of quality pie and how much should they have to pay for it—all the while the interstellar spaceship on which they’re all permanently confined, owned and operated by (besides the most wealthy) the fossil fuel industry, is on fire and toxifying at locations not normally investigated.

    Although I very much want to be proven wrong, we, in short, are distracting ourselves from our own burning and heavily polluting of our sole spaceship (i.e. Earth).

    What is sufficiently universal, however, is that the laborers are simply too exhausted and preoccupied with just barely feeding and housing their families on a substandard, if not below the poverty line, income to criticize the former for the great damage it’s doing to our planet’s natural environment and therefore our health, particularly when that damage may not be immediately observable.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s